Copywriting | Social Media Strategy
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Copy Editing

 

Sample of editing work.

  Image by  George Hodan

Image by George Hodan

BEFORE

UCLA Original Monograph Text

The 2016 U.S. presidential election, the second Supreme Court case pertaining to affirmative action in college admissions, and increased intensity of confronting and preventing sexual assault on campus by colleges and universities represent just a few of the many critical issues facing higher education during the past year. Findings from the 2016 Freshman Survey as well as studies analyzing other datasets compiled and maintained by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI) inform these debates.

HERI published two research briefs in the fall of 2015 that provide further evidence linking diverse college campuses with strong academic and co-curricular outcomes. Jayakumar (2015) and Hurtado and Ruiz Alvarado (2015) conclude greater diversity on college campuses respectively correlates with reduced racialized vulnerability for students of color and with fewer incidents of bias or discrimination reported by Black and Latino students. The amicus brief submitted by the American Educational Research Association (AERA) cited these studies in its support of the argument put forth by the University of Texas regarding the critical need for higher education institutions to have the flexibility to consider race/ethnicity as one component of a more holistic review of applicants’ files. In June 2016, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of the University of Texas.

Read the Full Original Introduction

 

AFTER

Published Monograph with My Revisions

Polarized politics, mental health concerns and expanding views on identity are heated national topics that colleges and universities helped us measure this last year. With the findings from the 2016 Freshman Survey and other datasets compiled and maintained by the Higher Education Research Institute (HERI), campuses now have important figures to enable creative solutions and support to make a real impact on their students, their institutions and the future of these debates.  

Last June, our research helped inform the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold Univeristy of Texas’ affirmative action program. Our 2015 briefs provided evidence linking diverse college campuses with strong academic and co-curricular outcomes. From this data Jayakumar (2015) and Hurtado and Ruiz Alvarado (2015) concluded that greater diversity on college campuses reduces racialized vulnerability for students of color and fewer reported incidents of bias or discrimination by Black and Latino students. The American Educational Research Association (AERA) cited these studies in its support of The University of Texas, which fought and won for higher education institutes to have the flexibility to consider race/ethnicity as one component of a more holistic review of applicants’ files. 

Read the Full Published Monograph